Glasgow to start consultation on phase 2 of its Low Emission Zone

Glasgow City Council has announced that consultation on the second phase of its Low Emission Zone is set to begin later this month.

The council introduced phase one of the Low Emission Zone (LEZ) in 2018 in order to address harmful levels of nitrogen dioxide in the city centre. Phase 1 applies to local bus services only, whereas phase 2 will be far broader and will include all vehicles, except those that are exempt.

A report went to the Environment, Sustainability & Carbon Reduction City Policy Committee yesterday (8 June 2021) to provide an update on the progress of the LEZ and to detail the proposed scheme design for its second phase, ahead of a statutory consultation due to start later this month, reports Air Quality News.

The progress of phase 2 is dependent on legislation, the progress of which was temporarily impacted by covid-19.

This means that enforcement of this second phase is now expected to be from June 2023 (subject to the relevant approvals), which is slightly later than originally anticipated.

The consultation, which opens later this month will set out the rationale behind the requirement for a LEZ in Glasgow city centre and will include details of its scope, proposed start date, intended boundary, and grace periods for zone residents and non-residents.

Cllr Anna Richardson, convener for sustainability and carbon reduction said: ‘The introduction of Glasgow’s Low Emission Zone in 2018 shows our resolute determination to tackle air pollution in the city centre and beyond.

‘To ease compliance, we are raising early awareness as well as supporting a wide range of projects and initiatives that encourage higher levels of active and more sustainable travel, and a reduced reliance on private vehicles. Our consultation will set out in detail, Phase 2 of Glasgow’s LEZ, and we hope to get feedback from as many people as possible when it opens later this month.’

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